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Developing Drivers with the Windows® Driver Foundation

Developing Drivers with the Windows® Driver Foundation

Developing Drivers with the Windows® Driver Foundation

Start developing robust drivers with expert guidance from the teams who developed Windows Driver Foundation. This comprehensive book gets you up to speed quickly and goes beyond the fundamentals to help you extend your Windows development skills. You get best practices, technical guidance, and extensive code samples to help you master the intricacies of the next-generation driver model—and simplify driver development.

Discover how to:Use the Windows Driver Foundation to develop kernel-mode or user-mode drivers Create drivers that support Plug and Play and power management—with minimal code Implement robust I/O handling code Effectively manage synchronization and concurrency in driver code Develop user-mode drivers for protocol-ba

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3 Responses to “Developing Drivers with the Windows® Driver Foundation”

  1. Huang Da says:
    24 of 25 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Practical, sample-oriented introduction, July 23, 2007
    By 
    Huang Da (WA USA) –

    This review is from: Developing Drivers with the Windows® Driver Foundation (Paperback)

    This book does exactly what it says, it provides a practical, sample-oriented introduction to developing drivers the Microsoft Windows Driver Foundation way.

    The driver code for the samples used in the book, tools needed for developing drivers, and reference documentation are all downloadable (all 2.5GB of it, but it’s free) from Microsoft. If you’re like me and spend only a small part of your time working on drivers (I’m trying to interface a USB gadget), this is a great guide to WDF as well as to Windows I/O techniques and interface best practices. To get started, you can just hack the samples provided, as the authors intend. WDF looks after plug-n-play and power management, so it makes it easy to develop a basic user-mode USB driver like mine.

    If you’re a driver specialist, are writing kernel drivers, or have drivers to port from a different operating system, then the book is a detailed reference for moving to WDF. There’s a lot of abstraction in the Windows way of doing drivers, and understanding the abstractions helps you write and debug your driver, so this book does a comprehensive job of explaining the relevant abstractions as you go along.

    For example, if you’re already an expert in the COM programming model, so that it’s obvious to you why you need to implement the IUnknown methods, then you can likely skip most of Chapter 18. For the rest of us, we need the how-to advice and the examples, so there’s a good reason the book is close to 900 pages :).

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  2. J. Carbonell says:
    16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    It’s two, maybe three books in one., August 24, 2007
    By 
    J. Carbonell
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Developing Drivers with the Windows® Driver Foundation (Paperback)

    The content of the book feels more accessible than the online WDK documentation. It does cover the material, but each chapter is divided into three parts: stuff common between the kernel driver framework and user mode driver framework, stuff about the kernel driver framework, and stuff about the user mode driver framework. The authors probably had a hard time organizing the material, but the book should have been structured into those three parts. For example, I’m not currently interested in developing a user mode driver and I found the user mode driver material distracting.

    This book is more reference than how-to. Maybe the authors should have structured the book like some of the Linux driver books: develop a real device driver.

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  3. Jonathan Ludwig "Jonathan" says:
    5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Great book on WDF, but not for learning Windows driver development, December 1, 2010
    By 

    This review is from: Developing Drivers with the Windows® Driver Foundation (Paperback)

    I found this book well organized and useful for learning the Windows Driver Foundation. This book, however, is not a complete book for learning Windows Driver Development. Unfortunately, the book makes the claim that it is for newbies. This cannot be the case, because it doesn’t give much in-depth information about Windows driver and kernel concepts, such as how memory is described (Neither I/O, buffered I/O or MDL’s), different execution contexts, IRQL levels and what can and cannot be done in these levels, and basic IRP and I/O Manager concepts. Beginners will still have to start by learning WDM from a book like “Programming the Windows Driver Model”. You just can’t expect to succeed using WDF if you don’t first have a firm grasp on WDM.

    I think this book provides an organized approach to learning WDF. It is, however, not a book for leaning Windows driver development basics. I actually thought the book read very well and I’m not a fast reader at all.

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